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Habitual Traffic Offender
Habitual Traffic Offenders are defined by the Colorado Revised Statutes in 42-2-202. The criteria for HTO are:Three (3) convictions within 7 years of: DUI, DWAI, DUID, Reckless driving, Driving under Suspension, Revocation or Denial, Vehicular Assault, Homicide, Manslaughter, or Criminally Negligent Homicide, Hit and Run involving death or personal injuries. Alternatively: Ten (10) or more convictions within five (5) years of 4-point moving violations.Eighteen (18) or more convictions within five (5) years of 3-point moving violations.

Three major traffic offenses within a 7 year period or accumulation of too many points against a driver’s license may result in being convicted as an Habitual Traffic Offender. Habitual Traffic Offender status can result in an increase in auto insurance rates, difficulty in finding a job or a new place to live. The penalties for subsequent traffic offenses increase in severity. If you drive after your license has been revoked as a Habitual Traffic Offender you can be charged with the crime of Motor Vehicle Used to Commit a Felony. This results in an automatic one year revocation of your driving privileges. At the DMV hearing it wil be determined if you’re eligible to reinstate, you will need to pay the $95.00 reinstatement fee, show proof of insurance, SR22 for 3 years from the date of reinstatement and pass the eye, written and drive tests. If you drive after you have been convicted as a Habitual Traffic Offender and also commit certain crimes such as driving under the influence DUI, you can be charged with Aggravated Driving with a Revoked License, a Class 6 Felony.

42-2-206. Driving after revocation prohibited.
(1) (a) (I) It is unlawful for any person to operate any motor vehicle in this state while the revocation of the department prohibiting the operation remains in effect. Any person found to be an habitual offender, who operates a motor vehicle in this state while the revocation of the department prohibiting such operation is in effect, commits a class 1 misdemeanor.

(II) Notwithstanding the provisions of section 18-1.3-501, C.R.S., any person convicted of violating subparagraph (I) of this paragraph (a) shall be sentenced to a mandatory minimum term of imprisonment in the county jail for thirty days, or a mandatory minimum fine of three thousand dollars, or both. The minimum jail sentence and fine required by this subparagraph (II) shall be in addition to any other penalty provided in section 18-1.3-501, C.R.S. The court may suspend all or a portion of the mandatory jail sentence or fine if the defendant successfully completes no less than forty hours, and no greater than three hundred hours, of useful public service. In no event shall the court sentence the convicted person to probation. Upon the defendant's successful completion of the useful public service, the court shall vacate the suspended sentence. In the event the defendant fails or refuses to complete the useful public service ordered, the court shall impose the jail sentence, fine, or both, as required under this subparagraph (II).

(b) (I) A person commits the crime of aggravated driving with a revoked license if he or she is found to be an habitual offender and thereafter operates a motor vehicle in this state while the revocation of the department prohibiting such operation is in effect and, as a part of the same criminal episode, also commits any of the following offenses:

(A) DUI or DUI per se;

(B) DWAI;

(C) Reckless driving, as described in section 42-4-1401;

(D) Eluding or attempting to elude a police officer, as described in section 42-4-1413;

(E) Violation of any of the requirements specified for accidents and accident reports in sections 42-4-1601 to 42-4-1606; or

(F) Vehicular eluding, as described in section 18-9-116.5, C.R.S.

(II) Aggravated driving with a revoked license is a class 6 felony, punishable as provided in section 18-1.3-401, C.R.S.

On January 1, 2005, the City Council revised the Denver Municipal Code to include Habitual Traffic Offenders. Since that date, the Public Nuisance Abatement Unit of the Denver Police Department has filed civil cases upon vehicles of HTO drivers.


Teen Drivers
There are certain restrictions placed on teens under 18 who have a driver’s license:
1. You can’t drive a vehicle carrying a passenger under 21 unless you’ve had your driver’s license for at least 6 months.
2. You can’t drive a vehicle carrying more than one passenger under 21 unless you’ve had your driver’s license for at least one year.
Unless:
3. Your parent or guardian is in the car with you
4. There’s an adult, 21 years of age or older who has a valid driver’s license for at least one year,
5.The passenger under 21 needs emergency medical assistance, or
6.The passengers under 21 are members of your immediate family and they’re all wearing seatbelts.
You can’t drive between the ours of midnight, 12:00 a.m. and 5:00 a.m. unless you have your drivers license for at least one year except for the situations listed above, 3, 4, and
5. You’re driving to school or a school authorized activity and the school doesn’t provide transportation. You need a signed statement from the school official showing the date of the activity.
6. You are driving because of employment; you must carry a signed statement from your employer verifying your employment.
7. You are driving because of an emergency.
8. You are an emancipated minor but your parent(s) or guardian(s) have not cancelled your license.
Cell Phones – Colorado law prohibits a person under 18 years of age from using a cell phone while driving unless it’s to contact the police or fire department or it’s an emergency.
Drivers 18 and older may not use a cell phone for text messaging while driving unless it’s to contact the police or fire department or it’s an emergency.